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whatsnewbuffalo:

James Kuntsler - How Bad Architecture Wrecked Cities

Why are young adults moving back to Buffalo? This humorous 2007 TED Talk by James Kuntsler, although not specifically about Buffalo, articulates urban design problems particularly found in the suburbs, but also in cities. This video is a must watch for anybody interested in improving the living spaces around us.

Buffalo has made a serious effort in restoring historic architecture, updating the zoning code, creating public spaces, becoming more bike-friendly, and drawing international conferences to the city such as Congress for the New Urbanism, the Society of Architectural Historians, and the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies. While Buffalo has made plenty of its own mistakes young people are drawn back to the city by the concerted effort to fix them.

(via urbanresolve)

asapscience:

jtotheizzoe:

colchrishadfield:

21,000 years ago, the ice over Montreal was 3 kilometers thick, and dwarfed the Sears and CN Towers. The land is still rising back up like a sponge from the great weight of the ice. Conditions changing over time. (xkcd)

So which one is Winterfell, Toronto or Montreal?

Having lived in both Toronto and Montreal, Montreal still sometimes feels like this? Amirite?

asapscience:

jtotheizzoe:

colchrishadfield:

21,000 years ago, the ice over Montreal was 3 kilometers thick, and dwarfed the Sears and CN Towers. The land is still rising back up like a sponge from the great weight of the ice. Conditions changing over time. (xkcd)

So which one is Winterfell, Toronto or Montreal?

Having lived in both Toronto and Montreal, Montreal still sometimes feels like this? Amirite?

science-junkie:

Dinosaur-killing asteroid hit at just the wrong time
Animals might have survived if impact happened a few million years earlier or later.
Just before a large asteroid slammed into the Earth 66 million years ago, the diversity of plant-eating dinosaur species declined slightly, a new study suggests. That minor shift may have been enough to doom all dinosaurs when the space rock hit.
The scarcity of plant-eaters would have left them more vulnerable to starvation and population collapse after the impact, with consequences that rippled all the way up the food chain.
“The asteroid hit at a particularly bad time,” says Stephen Brusatte, a palaeontologist at the University of Edinburgh, UK. “If it had hit a few million years earlier or later, dinosaurs probably would have been much better equipped to survive.”
Brusatte and his colleagues describe this nuanced view of the famous extinction in Biological Reviews.
Read more @Nature.

science-junkie:

Dinosaur-killing asteroid hit at just the wrong time

Animals might have survived if impact happened a few million years earlier or later.

Just before a large asteroid slammed into the Earth 66 million years ago, the diversity of plant-eating dinosaur species declined slightly, a new study suggests. That minor shift may have been enough to doom all dinosaurs when the space rock hit.

The scarcity of plant-eaters would have left them more vulnerable to starvation and population collapse after the impact, with consequences that rippled all the way up the food chain.

“The asteroid hit at a particularly bad time,” says Stephen Brusatte, a palaeontologist at the University of Edinburgh, UK. “If it had hit a few million years earlier or later, dinosaurs probably would have been much better equipped to survive.”

Brusatte and his colleagues describe this nuanced view of the famous extinction in Biological Reviews.

Read more @Nature.

asapscience:

“A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo ContestLet’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 
via Sploid

asapscience:

A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo Contest

Let’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 

via Sploid

thisbigcity:

Which city quotes inspire you? Share them with us and we might include them in this series!

thisbigcity:

Which city quotes inspire you? Share them with us and we might include them in this series!

ucresearch:

How diamonds and lasers can recreate Jupiter’s core


Understanding what the insides of the biggest planets in the universe has been largely wrapped up in theories.  Now scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab have recreated these conditions with the help of diamonds and the world’s largest laser:

Though diamond is the least compressible material known, the researchers were able to compress it to an unprecedented density, greater than lead at ambient conditions.

The hope is to understand how these planets evolve over time by being able to reproduce their immense pressures.  You can read more about it here.

(via science-junkie)

Today we often forget that prior to World War II, every city in America was built for easy walking and biking. In fact, the idea of living in a walkable place is nothing radical. What was radical was the program we undertook to build an entirely new type of human life. We built networks of roadways and freeways like nothing any society had ever seen before. We tore down entire neighborhoods to accommodate these roads as well as the parking lots and garages required by the cars that would travel these roads; at the same time, we ripped out the tracks for streetcars and trains.
urbanresolve:

thisbigcity:

cadenced:

From Project for Public Spaces.

About as simple as it gets. 

The more you know! [aaaaaand shooting star]

urbanresolve:

thisbigcity:

cadenced:

From Project for Public Spaces.

About as simple as it gets. 

The more you know! [aaaaaand shooting star]

whatsnewbuffalo:

James Kuntsler - How Bad Architecture Wrecked Cities

Why are young adults moving back to Buffalo? This humorous 2007 TED Talk by James Kuntsler, although not specifically about Buffalo, articulates urban design problems particularly found in the suburbs, but also in cities. This video is a must watch for anybody interested in improving the living spaces around us.

Buffalo has made a serious effort in restoring historic architecture, updating the zoning code, creating public spaces, becoming more bike-friendly, and drawing international conferences to the city such as Congress for the New Urbanism, the Society of Architectural Historians, and the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies. While Buffalo has made plenty of its own mistakes young people are drawn back to the city by the concerted effort to fix them.

(via urbanresolve)

asapscience:

jtotheizzoe:

colchrishadfield:

21,000 years ago, the ice over Montreal was 3 kilometers thick, and dwarfed the Sears and CN Towers. The land is still rising back up like a sponge from the great weight of the ice. Conditions changing over time. (xkcd)

So which one is Winterfell, Toronto or Montreal?

Having lived in both Toronto and Montreal, Montreal still sometimes feels like this? Amirite?

asapscience:

jtotheizzoe:

colchrishadfield:

21,000 years ago, the ice over Montreal was 3 kilometers thick, and dwarfed the Sears and CN Towers. The land is still rising back up like a sponge from the great weight of the ice. Conditions changing over time. (xkcd)

So which one is Winterfell, Toronto or Montreal?

Having lived in both Toronto and Montreal, Montreal still sometimes feels like this? Amirite?

science-junkie:

Dinosaur-killing asteroid hit at just the wrong time
Animals might have survived if impact happened a few million years earlier or later.
Just before a large asteroid slammed into the Earth 66 million years ago, the diversity of plant-eating dinosaur species declined slightly, a new study suggests. That minor shift may have been enough to doom all dinosaurs when the space rock hit.
The scarcity of plant-eaters would have left them more vulnerable to starvation and population collapse after the impact, with consequences that rippled all the way up the food chain.
“The asteroid hit at a particularly bad time,” says Stephen Brusatte, a palaeontologist at the University of Edinburgh, UK. “If it had hit a few million years earlier or later, dinosaurs probably would have been much better equipped to survive.”
Brusatte and his colleagues describe this nuanced view of the famous extinction in Biological Reviews.
Read more @Nature.

science-junkie:

Dinosaur-killing asteroid hit at just the wrong time

Animals might have survived if impact happened a few million years earlier or later.

Just before a large asteroid slammed into the Earth 66 million years ago, the diversity of plant-eating dinosaur species declined slightly, a new study suggests. That minor shift may have been enough to doom all dinosaurs when the space rock hit.

The scarcity of plant-eaters would have left them more vulnerable to starvation and population collapse after the impact, with consequences that rippled all the way up the food chain.

“The asteroid hit at a particularly bad time,” says Stephen Brusatte, a palaeontologist at the University of Edinburgh, UK. “If it had hit a few million years earlier or later, dinosaurs probably would have been much better equipped to survive.”

Brusatte and his colleagues describe this nuanced view of the famous extinction in Biological Reviews.

Read more @Nature.

asapscience:

“A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo ContestLet’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 
via Sploid

asapscience:

A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo Contest

Let’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 

via Sploid

thisbigcity:

Which city quotes inspire you? Share them with us and we might include them in this series!

thisbigcity:

Which city quotes inspire you? Share them with us and we might include them in this series!

ucresearch:

How diamonds and lasers can recreate Jupiter’s core


Understanding what the insides of the biggest planets in the universe has been largely wrapped up in theories.  Now scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab have recreated these conditions with the help of diamonds and the world’s largest laser:

Though diamond is the least compressible material known, the researchers were able to compress it to an unprecedented density, greater than lead at ambient conditions.

The hope is to understand how these planets evolve over time by being able to reproduce their immense pressures.  You can read more about it here.

(via science-junkie)

Today we often forget that prior to World War II, every city in America was built for easy walking and biking. In fact, the idea of living in a walkable place is nothing radical. What was radical was the program we undertook to build an entirely new type of human life. We built networks of roadways and freeways like nothing any society had ever seen before. We tore down entire neighborhoods to accommodate these roads as well as the parking lots and garages required by the cars that would travel these roads; at the same time, we ripped out the tracks for streetcars and trains.
urbanresolve:

thisbigcity:

cadenced:

From Project for Public Spaces.

About as simple as it gets. 

The more you know! [aaaaaand shooting star]

urbanresolve:

thisbigcity:

cadenced:

From Project for Public Spaces.

About as simple as it gets. 

The more you know! [aaaaaand shooting star]

"Today we often forget that prior to World War II, every city in America was built for easy walking and biking. In fact, the idea of living in a walkable place is nothing radical. What was radical was the program we undertook to build an entirely new type of human life. We built networks of roadways and freeways like nothing any society had ever seen before. We tore down entire neighborhoods to accommodate these roads as well as the parking lots and garages required by the cars that would travel these roads; at the same time, we ripped out the tracks for streetcars and trains."

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"Make things as simple as possible, but not simpler." -- Albert Einstein

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